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Syrians Vote in Election Set to Extend President Al-Assad’s Grip On Power

Voters in government-held parts of Syria are heading to the polls to cast ballots in an election that is set to cement a fourth term for Bashar al-Assad – but

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad (C) and his wife Asma (R) cast their votes at a polling station in Douma, near Damascus on May 26, 2021, as voting began across Syria for an election guaranteed to return Assad for a fourth term in office. – The 55-year-old president, who has been in power since 2000, is sure to keep his job after the election, every aspect of which is controlled by him and his Baath party. He faces former state minister Abdallah Salloum Abdallah and Mahmoud Merhi, a member of the so-called “tolerated opposition”, long described by exiled opposition leaders as an extension of the regime. (Photo by LOUAI BESHARA / AFP)

Voters in government-held parts of Syria are heading to the polls to cast ballots in an election that is set to cement a fourth term for Bashar al-Assad – but is dismissed by the opposition and Western powers as a farce.

Wednesday’s presidential vote is the second since the beginning of Syria’s uprising-turned-war a decade ago, a conflict that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and forced millions to leave the country. In 2014, al-Assad won nearly 89 percent of the vote.

Al-Assad is seeking a fourth seven-year term against two government-approved opposition candidates: Abdullah Salloum Abdullah, former state minister of parliamentary affairs; and Mahmoud Ahmad Marei, head of the National Democratic Front, a small, state-endorsed opposition party. Forty-eight other presidential aspirants had submitted requests for candidacy, but their applications were rejected.

Al-Assad allies Iran and Russia, as well as Belarus, sent delegations to monitor the election.

Meanwhile, the foreign ministers of the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany and Italy issued a joint statement in which they described the polls as a sham. “For an election to be credible, all Syrians should be allowed to participate, including internally displaced Syrians, refugees, and members of the diaspora, in a safe and neutral environment,” the statement said.

The Syrian Democratic Council (SDC), which controls northeastern Syria, slammed al-Assad’s government for obstructing negotiations and meetings. “We will not be part of the presidential election process and we will not participate in it,” it said in a statement.

Like Western states, the SDC called for the full implementation of UN Security Council resolution 2254, which was passed unanimously in late 2015 and calls for an end to hostilities and a political solution to the Syrian conflict.

The resolution is meant to pave the way for internationally monitored elections following amendments to the constitution.

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